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to cnnmoney.com. now, watch this. >> many here in pakistan are seeing this latest move by the obama administration as disrespectful, as the u.s. not appreciating efforts by pakistan. >> the united states sending a strong message to pakistan. do your job better or no money. now pakistan firing back with a message all of its own, that's next. plus, just when we thought this whole uk tabloid hacking scandal is over. no. no -- news today, it's about to get a whole lot worse. back in a moment. miles per gallon on the highway. how does it do that? well, to get there, a lot of complicated engineering goes into every one. like variable valve timing and turbocharging, active front grille shutters that close at high speeds, and friction reducing -- oh, man, that is complicated. how about this -- cruze eco offers 42 miles per gallon. cool? ♪ when an investment lacks discipline, it's never this obvious. introducing investment discipline etfs from russell. visit russelletfs.com r a prospectus, containing the investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses and other information. read and consid
of the sanctuary across the border in pakistan. >> until the problem of insurgent and terror sanctuary in pakistan is effectively addressed and that can be addressed through military means. it can be addressed through political means or a combinations there of which is very much of our approach. until that problem has been satisfactorily addressed, then our enterprise in afghanistan and the long-term stability of afghanistan remains at risk. they look across the border into pakistan and see sanctuary there. they see enemy capability there. they see enemy leaders that are there that are not being hit right now. so their question is, why do we need 100,000 american troops inside of afghanistan when we know that a very big part of this problem sits inside of pakistan? >> reporter: a grim reality right there from the ambassador as he leaves afghanistan where he says that he will leave a part of his heart behind. chuck? >> all right. atia in kabul. thanks very much. >> those u.s. drone attacks in afghanistan have killed 45 militants in the last 24 hours. it comes a day after washington announced it wou
terrorist through security. even with bin laden's debt at the compound in may, pakistan is the base for the al-qaeda core leadership, including ayad allawi the egyptian doctor who replaced the al-qaeda leader. pakistan's ability to track known and suspected terrorists is substandard. >> it is stunning that pakistan which is supposed to be our ally in the war against terrorism does not even share finger print data within the own government. >> while information sharing and passport security improved in the u.s., former homeland security official says the disparity overseas remains a serious problem. >> the travel documents are the same as weapons, terrorists that can't carry off the plot without them. if i give us a grade abroad with the partners, some of is it out of our control, we're probably closer to a "c." >> some former intelligence officials say the u.s. should use leverage to encourage standards. for some nations it's resource problems. for otherssh it's refusal to cooperate. >> bret: thank you. the speaker of the house joins me live in studio exclusively after the break. [
, which is also the problem of pakistan, becomes a regional problem in which the country's in the region have a stake in solving and are not -- there's a reasonable chance that can be pulled off. >> dr. brzezinski, you mentioned pakistan. the focus of policy leaders. turning away from afghanistan, we got reports the journalist who was killed by the isi inside pakistan further out is complicating our relationship with that group. we announced going in to kill osama bin laden. how do we manage this relationship that's been difficult to manage for as far as the eye can see? >> well, first of all, we have to recognize we are dealing here with two sifrl conflicts. one in afghanistan and the one in pakistan. there's a conflict in pakistan. there isn't a foreign intervention trying to resolve it. it is a great internal conflict. what we are seeing in pakistan is a series of contradictory policies, contradictory engagements and contradictory engagements. the army wants to preserve a stable pakistan that is assured of security and sees the united states as a component of the success in that quest
of pakistan that will bring success to local areas. a country from kabul, it will never happen. we are wasting time and money. the fact we are leaving may assist in the development of stability in local areas. they will never be a centrally governed pakistan, i mean afghanistan. afghanistan is not like iraq. give me one more second and i'll tell you what i think is going to happen in iraq. we'll probably go back to having one bloodthirsty tyrant to rule the country. that's the irony of iraq. >> happy days, wes. >> afghanistan is extraordinarily tribal. it's difficult to have a conversation about afghanistan. one story i loved was one of the things we did in afghanistan when i was working with the civil affairs team, giving out flags to children and local leaders. they would look at the flag and say what is this. you would have to explain, it's your country. there's another thing, i think you brought up a good point, joe. afghanistan is not iraq. you are right. there's a crucial player, though that factors in. that's iran. iran is not only very active and involved, but in addition to that, iran
as well. pat. >> dr. brzezinski, let me talk to you about pakistan. powers flu out, richard nixon tilted, doctor brzezinski was over there looking down the pass. they were a great ally in the cold war. now it looks like we have lost pakistan. have we lost pakistan? if so, why and was it inevitable. >> i think we are losing pakistan. i don't know if we have lost it yet. if we disengage intelligently and engage in the umbrella i have been talking about, her happens we will lose it all together. i think the fault is two way. first of all, we have never been really consistently and comprehensively sensitive to the political interests in having a secure backyard in afghanistan. we just haven't. resently, we played with indi s indians. we give a super nuclear deal to the indians. we did not give it to the pakistanis. there's resentment there. pakistan is coming undone on its own. it's not all our undoing. there's a conflict between the army and society at large. divisions between the army and the military and intelligence. ethnic differences. regional differences in pakistan. plus, this overw
sightedness of it gets us in more trouble than anything else. pertaining to pakistan, having grown up there in the earlier years of my life, and it cannot tell you the immense good will that was there for the americans in the 1980's when we were fighting the soviets and freedom fighters of that time. the day the soviets left, the very next day everyone packed up their bags and left. that region was left with the master deal with on its own. come 9/11, all of a sudden they want that place to be fixed. well, no one was there for 13-14 years. we need to have a longer-term view. if we do not do that, there is no way we can solve our problems. thank you and i will listen offline. host: that may be a way to look at the broader question before we wrap up, but the remainder of the middle east long term. guest: this gets to the issue we spoke about earlier about whether the u.s. is going to support the democratic process in the future. i think the caller is right certainly in the case of pakistan and afghanistan. the united states lost sight of the importance of the region after the soviet the
pakistan, as we said on the show a number of times. how do we deal with pakistan and at the same time, get out of afghanistan except in terms of special forces or drones to represent our interest and chase down terrorists? meanwhile, you have the greatest tender box in the world, to save a nuclear pakistan with more than 100, probably twice as many with nuclear warheads that can fall into the hands of terrorists. >> the bottom line is, how do we deal with it? >> it's always pakistan is a basket case, a nuclear basket case. stay in afghanistan. >> you don't. you don't. >> it's not going to work. that is washington's argument, mike barnicle. pakistan is stabilized. we have to keep having american troops killed in afghanistan. it doesn't add up. invading cambodia is the right move when you are going into vietnam. >> continuing argument and keep making it because less than 1% of american families and american people are serving in the military in afghanistan. >> there you go. >> back to the draft. >> untouched. >> we need a draft. >> we'll come back the dr. aidan quinn. [ male announcer ] memb
. first, a news update. >> 17 past the hour. pakistan intelligence officials say 38 alleged militants have been killed by three suspected u.s. missiles in northwestern pakistan. this is in less than 12 hours. the attacks come two days after the obama administration suspended more than one-third of u.s. military aid to pakistan, about $800 million. the attacks indicate the white house has no intention of stopping the drone program. syria is accusing the u.s. a provocation after secretary of state hillary clinton said the president had lost legitimacy and was "not indispensable." this is one day after hamas attacked embassies. violent uprisings have been happening over the last four months as rebels tried to oust president assaad and and his family's 40-year rule. in the states, the gao says the government is making it more difficult to detect medicare fraud. in a report to be released today, they say the government systems for analyzing medicare and medicaid data are "inaccurate and underused." fraudulent claims are between $60 billion and $90 billion per year. we will hear more about that
and then there will be a social crisis, and then a political crisis. then right across the world pakistan has got concerns about the loss of aid and the impact that this would have on fighting terror. israel is worried about the position of the u.s. and the world that if the u.s. is weak at this point, then countries leak iran will start to feel emboldened. here in the us u.k. they're saying that internal u.s. political wrangling are pose aing real threat to the world's financial systems, alex. >>> it is a word president obama has been using repeatedly in the battle over raising the debt limit, but are enough lawmakers on capitol hill heeding his advice? we'll have the latest from the white house next on msnbc saturday. >> what's clear now is that any solution to avoid default must be bipartisan. it must have the support of both parties that we're sent here to represent the american people. not just one faction. the time for putting party first is over. the time for compromise on behalf of the american people is now. i am confident that we can solve this problem. i'm confident that we will solve this problem.
. these were sophisticated devices triggered by timers. these the first attacks here since gunmen from pakistan laid siege to the city in 2008. the authorities were taken by surprise. nobody has claimed responsibility for the attacks, although security experts say a domestic group-- the indian mughadeen are prime suspects. few here can see the point of it. "what do we tell our children," said this man. "they think these adults are mad." why kill innocent people? tonight, security has been ramped up across the nation and the police now better trained and resourced than they were a few years ago, but there are no shortage of targets in a country of 1.2 billion. >> sreenivasan: mumbai is india's financial capital and home to its movie industry as well. u.s. stocks turned lower today after federal reserve chairman ben bernanke played down talk of new stimulus moves. he had said yesterday that the fed was ready to act, if the economy gets worse. today, he emphasized that he expects things to improve, albeit slowly. in response, the dow jones industrial average lost 54 points to close at 12,437. the
that the u.s. owes it to the world to come to a solution and to do it quickly. further afield in pakistan there are worries about the loss of badly needed aid and the impact on anti-terrorism initiatives there, and israel is also saying that this threatens the position that the u.s. holds in the world and this could be construed as a sign of real weakness by countries like iran. here in the u.k. there's a feeling that internal u.s. political wranglings are posing a real threat, alex, to the world financial systems. >> yeah. how about the headlines that people are waking up to over there? are they pretty bold? >> well, actually, you know, it's not really making front page news at the moment. you know, it's -- there is a lot of reaction, and it's been reported as political theater. some of the hldz, though, are about savers desserting the stock because of the debt crisis, how the u.s. is playing with fire as the deadline looms, but, as i say, it's not front page news yet. there are some funny asides. one paper called is debt-ageddon and one says apple has much more cash than the u.s. govern
. pakistan is a good example of a country where information sharing among known and suspected terrorists is still lacking. >> it is stunning that pakistan, which is supposed to be our ally in the war against terrorism, does not even share fingerprint data within its own government. it doesn't share it with other pakistanis -- pakistani law enforcement agencies. that's a real problem. >> reporter: so the bottom line is that we can pour billions of dollars into our airport security but the overall system, of course, is only as good as the weakest link, gregg. gregg: the senator said this issue is more now. what has changed in that regard? >> >> reporter: let's take the example of the underwear bomber, it's a good example of a foreign national, in this case a nigerian, who came through yemen and on to amsterdam before he boarded a flight on christmas day in 2009, the american cleric, anwar al-awlaki, the first american on the kill or capture list was the first man there, abdulmutallab, and the bomb maker. >> the threat is far more diverge than it was -- diverse than it was a decade ago. now
afghanistan, pakistan. you're reading a couple pieces in the "new york times." now it's spreading to all of these different countries and one that really jumped off the page for me, drone attacks in somalia. >> joining us, jeremy scahill, on the cia secret sites in somalia, jeremy, the secret training programs and secret prisons out of somalia is part of your reporting there. how big a threat are these terrorist group there's? >> we should say first of all president obama campaigned on a promise to go up against these bush era policies declaring war on the world, running secret sites, torturing prisoners. deeply involved in an underground dungeon officially run by the somali national security agency, but their salaries are paid by the cia directly. in fact, one somali agent described thousand hairli ed ho and paid by u.s. agents and the u.s. is interrogating prisoners, including those rendered by the kenyan government, snatched off the streets in nairobi based on u.s. intelligence and taken to this secret prison and interrogated. it goes against the president's ordered he signed in janua
certainly hurt the al-qaeda terrorist organization, in pakistan and afghanistan. but anwar al-awlaki is alive and well in yemen and he is planning additional attacks against americans. is the franchise there now the lead in al-qaeda and how dangerous and what can we do? >> al-qaeda is somewhat diffuse in the islamist most of the time. yemen a fertile ground. it does seem to be emerging as headquarters of sorts. yemen as a state doesn't exist right now. it was an iffy topic when it had a president but it essentially doesn't right now. so al-qaeda finding an open door. president obama came out and said the tide of war is receding but nobody gave that message to the islamist terrorists. we this had the christmas day bombing, not the one on the flight but the on other one on fed ex shipments. >> gregg: speaking of terrorists let's talk about libya and moammar khadafy who says he is willing to talk to america but he refuses to give up his position. so what is the point of talking to the guy? >> this has been going for five months. people have said that khadafy is losing or close to
-qaida operatives still plot and plan across the border in pakistan. the taliban still try to regain lost ground, still intimidate and still assassinate as we just saw this past week about the brutal killing of president karzai's brother. hamid karzai trying to climb into his brother's grave last week is facing almost daily challenges to his rule. his brother was assassinated by a trusted bodyguard. a former governor and loyal political adviser to karzai was assassinate ned his apartment by two taliban gunman wearing bomb belts. >> in crushing heat and in numbing cold from the deserts of southern afghanistan to the peaks of the behind due kush. you have shown initiative, determination, innovative necessary and courage. you have been diplomats as well as warriors, statesman as well as soldiers. your performance as been in a word awesome. >> reporter: general petraeus handed over his command to marine general john allen. petraeus will retire from the army and particular over as the head of the cia in september. >> there will be tough days ahead. and i have no illusions about the challenges we will
of the wars in afghanistan and pakistan. >> still not getting serious. >> i went away from fuzzy. >> is that like jerry at trick math? >> yes. >> are you surprised they don't have a deal today? i actually really -- i mean, i really thought -- >> i would be shocked if they don't have a deal in the next two or three days. again, republican freshmen may have a big ideology difference with barack obama and his world view, and the divide is no greater than ronald reagan's was with tip o'neal in 1983 when they sat down, and they did a kneel. yes, you differ with barack obama and the democrats, but -- >> usually you are good at seeing somebody's angle. like you know what their angle was. what is the angle here? i don't get it. >> these republicans believe this is their only opportunity -- >> are they so stuck to the contract with the tea party they cannot think outside the box for the good of the country? seriously? >> can i finish? you asked a question and i need to finish. they understand one thing. >> what do they understand? >> they are dead right about this. this is their best chan
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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